Screen Shot 2015-12-04 at 9.14.01 AMWe use phrases such as “I have to” or “I have no choice” or “I can’t.” We always have a choice. We may not like the consequences that come with our choices, but we always have a choice.

We can practice replacing “I have to” or “I have no choice” or “I can’t” with “I choose to” or “I choose not to.” We can notice both the fear and the exhilaration that shows up when we practice taking 100% responsibility for what we choose.

We can notice the feelings of powerlessness when we hold someone or some circumstance responsible for our choices. We can notice how we try to make other people’s choices for them. And we can notice how we tell other people that they have no choice.

We have never really have control over others anyway — only the illusion of control when they choose to do what we tell them or ask them to do. And other people never really have control over us — only the illusion of control when we choose to do what others tell us or ask us to do.

We tell others that they have no choice and others tell us that we have no choice. Voices in our own heads tell us that we have no choice. But, you are always free to choose — you always have been — no matter what anyone (including you) tells you.

And once we have chosen, we can work with the consequences. Blaming or complaining is not a requirement of working with the consequences of our choices. Blaming and complaining accomplish nothing, but at least we feel terrible while we are doing it. We can meet whatever shows up with awareness, compassion, and purpose. Because we get to choose how we respond, not what shows up.[/fusion_text]